A Castle of Words
Issue 03, 84 pages, €10

The third issue of This Century’s Review has the title “A Castle of Words” because it is devoted to the relationship between law and literature. We analyse the creative power of language, how a few words are changing the role of the European Central Bank, Hungary’s constitution, migration policies and the dissemination of political culture around the world.

Also in this issue, This Century’s Review continues its cooperation with an artist. Following our previous collaborations with Clemens-Tobias Lange and conductor Paolo Manetti, we are honoured to feature photographs by Federico Pacini.

Authors // biographies

Malcolm Coulthard - Emeritus Professor of Forensic Linguistics at the University of Aston and Distinguished Visiting Professor at the Federal University of Santa Catarina, Florianopolis (Brazil): Co-Writing Justice

Malcolm Coulthard is Emeritus Professor of Forensic Linguistics at the University of Aston and Distinguished Visiting Professor at the Federal University of Santa Catarina, Brazil. He is probably still best known for his work on the analysis of spoken and written discourse, but since the late 1980s he has become increasingly involved with forensic applications of linguistics. He has written expert reports in over 220 cases and given evidence on author identification in the Courts of Appeal in London, as well as in lower courts in England, Germany, Hong Kong and Northern Ireland. Major publications with Alison Johnson in the area of Forensic Linguistics are ‘An Introduction to Forensic Linguistics’, 2007 and ‘A Handbook of Forensic Linguistics’, 2010.

Gábor Halmai - Visiting Research Scholar at Princeton University and professor of Law at the Eötvös Loránd University in Budapest: Constitutionalism and Democracy. Hungary’s new Fundamental Law

Gábor Halmai is professor of Law at the Eötvös Loránd University in Budapest. He is currently Visiting Research Scholar at Princeton University and, since 2003, he has been the national director of the European Masters Program in Human Rights and Democratization in Venice. He is a former member of the Management Board of the EU Fundamental Rights Agency, and had previously served as chief counsellor to the President of the Hungarian Constitutional Court. He has published widely on Comparative Constitutional Law and Human Rights. His latest book Perspectives of Global Constitutionalism will be published by Eleven International Publishing.

Adamantia Karali Co-Writing Justice

Adamantia Karali is a PhD researcher in Forensic Linguistics at the University of the Aegean, Rhodes, Greece. She has been a distance learning tutor in Linguistics at the University of Birmingham, UK, since 2000, and a court secretary at the Athens Court of Appeal, Greece, since 2001.

Petra Hardt - Head of the Rights Department at Suhrkamp Verlag (Berlin): How a Publishing House Disseminates (Legal) Culture

Petra Hardt studied Romance Literature and wrote a PhD on the ‘Lyrik der Résistance’. She has worked at Suhrkamp Verlag (Berlin) since 1995 and has been the Head of the Rights Department since 2000.

Marta López Torres - Deputy Head of the Institutional Law Division at the European Central Bank: The Changing Lexicon of the European Central Bank

Marta López Torres is Deputy Head of the Institutional Law Division at the European Central Bank. Before joining the ECB, she worked in the European Commission and the international U.S. firm Hunton & Williams. She also served one year in the legal services of the International Monetary Fund. She has a law degree from her home-town university in Pamplona, Spain. She completed her post-graduate education at King’s College, London, and the European University Institute, Florence.

Frank Mc Namara - European University Institute: Do good fences make good neighbours?

Frank Mc Namara is a PhD candidate at the European University Institute. His doctoral research considers the effects of externalisation and privatisation on migrants in the EU. He has previously worked in the Office of the Refugee Applications Commissioner and the Refugee Appeals Tribunal in Ireland and as a Trainee at the European Commission in the Unit for Border Management and Schengen Governance/Relations with Frontex. His postgraduate degrees are an LL.B (from the National University of Ireland, Galway); an LL.M in European Law (University of Edinburgh); and an LL.M in Comparative, European and International Legal Studies (European University Institute).

Christoph Möllers - Professor of Law at the Humboldt University of Berlin, and Judge at the Supreme Administrative Court of Berlin-Brandeburg: Forms of the Possible – on Law and Literature

Christoph Möllers is Professor of Law at the Humboldt University of Berlin, and Judge at the Supreme Administrative Court of Berlin-Brandeburg. He is also Permanent Fellow at the Wissenschaftskolleg of Berlin where he is the Head of the Programs ‘Law in Context’ and ‘Legal Cultures’ (Co-head Prof. Susanne Baer). He studied Philosophy of Law, Public and Comparative Law at the legal faculties of Tübingen, München and Madrid.

Iker Nabaskues - Professor of Philosophy of Law and Theory of Law at the University of the Basque Country: The Strange Case of Literature and Justice: Robert Louis Stevenson

Iker Nabaskues teaches Philosophy of Law and Theory of Law at the University of the Basque Country. He has also worked in Public Administration in the area of Social Services. Specialized in welfare-state policies, he is the author of Globalización y nueva política local (IVAP, 2003) on the role of local governments as creators of new social policies in the era of globalization. He received his doctoral degree from the University of the Basque Country for his thesis “Robert Louis Stevenson: Ethics, narrative and justice”. His research has focused on literature and film as cultural elements that help in the formation of free citizens and on the use of novels as a means of iusphilosophical analysis.

Thomas Weitin - Professor of German Literature at the University of Konstanz: The Devil is in the Human Dignity: Goethe’s Faust

Thomas Weitin is Professor of German Literature at the University of Konstanz.

Collaboration with Federico Pacini

Federico Pacini, Untitled, 2012

The images appearing alongside the texts in the current issue of TCR are the work of the Tuscan photographer Federico Pacini. “At first glance they seem to be random snippets of normal everyday life, shabby, even. The intention of these representations is not, however, to celebrate the beauty of banality (and even less so the banality of beauty): they are simply chronicling a banality that exists around us, and which we cannot banish just because we wish to. It is a banality which is as much a part of us as it is of our field of vision.”
Luca Quattrocchi, Professor Contemporary Art History, Siena University

Federico Pacini (born 1977) has received numerous international awards. Amongst these, his book 0001735.tif was awarded a prize both at the 'IPA International Photography Awards' of 2009 (New York, Lincoln Centre), and at the 'Prix de la Photographie de Paris' in 2010.


‘Both the majesty and the misery of our societies are regulated by a castle made of words. Literary representations unashamedly expose the reality of human nature, while human dignity is grounded in our awareness of our limitations. Legal systems evolve on the basis of an appropriate choice of words, and they reveal their strength or fragility by the same means. It is linguistic subtleties that change constitutions, amend migration policies and redefine the role of institutions.’

Editorial, Issue 03
Laura Di Gregorio, Editor-in-chief

Photo: Serena Carloni

Veiling // Short story

This Century’s Review wishes to pay tribute to both literature and law with the publication of Veiling, a short story based on an illusory superimposition of emotional states and legal ploys.

“Random images, recorded who knows when and where on the Internet, were forming in the atmosphere. The air was stratifying in transparent curtains, overlapping like veils. Photos, emails, videos, ads, search engines, digital encyclopedias were slipping into invisible interstices. Entire folders were refracted with varying intensity in no apparent order, sometimes just as faint glimmers, a blur indistinguishable from everyday reality, while others were glowing figures which attached themselves to the real world, even supplanting it. The duration of the phenomenon was also unpredictable; it went from flashes lasting just a few seconds to effects continuing for minutes at a time. In India, a lady in a field of pink flowers had seen a whale arching. Its large grey tail had sunk into an ocean which had appeared out of nowhere, whose waves submerged flowers and bushes, transforming them into a credible seascape. The filming was an incomprehensible collage: the wind was blowing and the pink petals formed a cloud of plankton between the fins of the large, steel blue cetacean. The lady kept on filming – gasping in astonishment, she uttered no words, just giggled occasionally – up until the moment she lowered her video camera and saw her shoes turning into a brood of luminous jellyfish. Terrible screams could be heard in the final moments of the video. The camera was then thrown away, going off. Afterwards, the unfortunate lady recounted her ridiculous efforts to swim in the ocean depths. She jumped and flailed around in a field of flowers she could no longer see. She kept breathing like an awkward amphibian, thrashing around while trying in vain to return to the surface. Her absurd gesticulations would have made her pass out had not the huge mass of water suddenly disappeared. A sound like that of an electrical switch put an end to the projection, extinguishing any sidereal reflection and reverting to an unblemished vision of countless pink flowers…”

An extract from ‘Veiling’, by Laura Di Gregorio


A Castle of Words Issue 03

Issue 02, 84 pages, €10

Authors Issue 02 // biographies

Carlos Bernal - Senior lecturer at Macquarie Law School (Sydney, Australia): The Drama of the Law as a Collective Play

Carlos Bernal is a senior lecturer at Macquarie Law School (Sydney, Australia). He has research interests in the fields of jurisprudence and constitutional theory. He has published widely in these fields in seven different languages. His qualifications include a LL.B. from the University Externado of Colombia (Bogota) (1996), a S.J.D. from the University of Salamanca (Spain) (2001) and a M.A. (2008) and a Ph.D. in Philosophy (2011) from the University of Florida (USA). He has delivered lectures and presented papers in more than 20 countries. He is currently working on a project on collective intentionality and the nature of law.

Anna Cento Bull - Professor of Italian History and Politics at the University of Bath, UK: The Limits of Retributive Justice in Italy: The Limits of Retributive Justice in Italy: The Outcomes of Recent Trials on Bombing Massacres Perpetrated in the Late 1960s and 1970s

Anna Cento Bull is Professor of Italian History and Politics at the University of Bath, UK. She has examined the legacy of 1960s-1970s Italian terrorism, exploring issues related to reconciliation, memory, truth and justice and comparing the views of victims, perpetrators and politicians close to the right. Her early research focused on extreme- right terrorism. The findings of this research have been published as journal articles, book chapters, and a solo- authored book, Italian Neofascism. The Strategy of Tension and the Politics of Nonreconciliation, published by Berghahn in 2007 (re-published in paperback in 2011). More recently, her research has examined the end of terrorism and its legacy in Italy with reference to both left and right terrorism, thanks to a new major round of interviews with former terrorists and victims/relatives of victims. A new book, entitled Ending Terrorism in Italy, written jointly with Dr Philip Cooke, University of Strathclyde, is to be published by Routledge in 2013.

Jean-Pierre Cassarino - Professor at the Robert Schuman Centre for Advanced Studies (European University Institute, Florence): Shaping Policy Perceptions: Revising the Migration Script

Jean-Pierre Cassarino is professor at the Robert Schuman Centre for Advanced Studies (European University Institute, EUI, Florence) where he directs the Return Migration and Development Platform (http://rsc.eui.eu/RDP/). He is also research associate at the Tunis- based Institute for Research on Contemporary Maghreb (Institut de Recherche sur le Maghreb Contemporain, IRMC, Tunis) and a member of the academic network of the Border Crossing Observatory at Monash University (Melbourne, Australia). He has researched and published extensively on migration policies and state-to-state cooperation as wellas on migrants’ conditions and realities in their broadest sense, while carrying out various field surveys in North and sub-Saharan Africa and in the Caucasus.

Magda Bianco - Head of the Law & Economics Research department at the Bank of Italy: Getting the Law Back to Work

Magda Bianco is head of the Law & Economics Research department at the Bank of Italy where, in various departments, she has worked since 1989. From 1992 to 1996 she has been professor of Industrial Organisation at the Università degli Studi di Bergamo. She holds a Ph.D. degree in Economics from the London School of Economics and Political Science and a master degree in Economics. Her current research interests are in the field of corporate governance and company law; the economics of bankruptcy; the economics of civil justice. She has published articles on Italian corporate governance, bank-firm relationships, financial structure.

Jakob Braeuer - Lawyer at Heller & Partner, Berlin, Joanna Warsza and Tea Tupajić - Curator for visual and performing art and architecture: Art Legally on the Edge

Jakob Braeuer is a lawyer at Heller & Partner, Berlin. The firm specialises in art law. Among its clients are numerous internationally well-known artists, galleries, and art institutions. Jakob Braeuer studied in Berlin, Salamanca, and London, and holds an LL.M. in IntellectualProperty Law from the London School of Economics and Political Science.

Joanna Warsza is a curator for visual and performing art and architecture. She was an associate curator of the 7th Berlin Biennale. She graduated from Warsaw Theater Academy Theater Studies department and the University of Paris 8 dance department. She is a founder of the independent platform Laura Palmer Foundation www.laura-palmer. pl). Warsza has worked mostly in the public realm, curating projects that examine social and political agendas. She is one of the curators of upcoming Gothenburg Biennale and curator of the Georgian Pavilion at the Venice Biennale 2013. She is an editor of ‘Stadium-X – A Place That Never Was’ (2009) and ‘Forget Fear’ (2012).

Tea Tupajic, born in Sarajevo, 1984, is a Croatian theatre director. In 2010-2012 she created ‘The Curator’s Piece’ in collaboration with Petra Zanki and several performances and conferences as a part of ‘The Agora Project’ initiated by Jan Ritsema. Her projects have been presented in venues/ festivals such as BIT Teatergarasjen (Bergen), Bastard (Trondheim), TUPP festival (Uppsala), Tanzquartier Wien (Vienna), Kaaitheater (Brussels), steirischer herbst (Graz), PACT Zollverein (Essen). Guest editior for the magazine Frakcija.

Ioanna Kondyli - Assistant Professor of Civil Law in Faculty of Law of National and Kapodistrian University of Athens: Disability in Theatre and Law

Ioanna Kondyli (B.A. National and Kapodistrian University of Athens; DEA in General Private Law & DEA in Sociology of Law and Social Relationships, Panthéon- Assas University; Doctorat d’état Panthéon- Assas University) is an Assistant Professor of Civil Law in Faculty of Law of National and Kapodistrian University of Athens. She teaches general principles of civil law, hereditary law as well as interpretation of laws and legal transactions. She has received prestigious prizes (1st prize, French Centre of Comparative Law; Label – European Doctorate 1992). She is Vice-President of the State School of Dance (Athens), Honorary President in Onassis Scholars’ Association Board of Directors and editorial advisor in AΩ International Online Magazine. She produces several radio broadcasts on legal, social and cultural issues.

Cledia Sedda - Actor and writer for theatre, cinema and radio:Caramel Jail, Personal Shopper for the Accused

Cledia Sedda is an actor and writer for theatre, cinema and radio. She graduated with a dissertation on the music of silent films and holds a PhD on the origins of cinema as a scientific instrument. Her current research interests lie with communication and performing – in particular the use of art and comedy to communicate scientific principles and theories. She has written plays performed in various theatres across Italy and recently acted in Pupi Avati’s film: Il cuore grande delle ragazze.

Miriam Aziz - Visiting scholar at Cardozo Law School, New York: Lost for Words: Law as Tanztheater

Miriam Aziz is a visiting scholar at Cardozo Law School, New York, as well as holding a Visiting Professorship at Université Paris Dauphine. Aziz’s research and teaching focuses on basic questions of culture, citizenship and human rights in European and International Law and Law & Humanities. An accomplished artist, she is also Founder and Artistic Director of a performance arts laboratory called Artist(s) at Large which is a creative platform that she also uses for legal scholarship and teaching about legal narratives.

Jean Paul Hernández - Jesuit and professor of theological anthropology at the Theological Faculty of Bologna: Job: God’s Accuser

Jean Paul Hernández is Jesuit and professor of theological anthropology at the Theological Faculty of Bologna

Paolo Manetti - Conductor of the Chamber Orchestra of Ravenna: Truths of Faith

Paolo Manetti studied under Bruno Bettinelli in Milan and graduated in composition, conducting, choral music and choral conducting. He performs as a conductor in Italy and abroad, favouring the symphonic repertoire and collaborating with internationally renowned soloists. He has been conductor of the Chamber Orchestra of Ravenna since 2001. He created the concert series Organ and Orchestra in Romanticism, currently held at Basilica of San Vitale in Ravenna, www.organoeorchestra.it. He is Professor of Orchestral Practice at the Conservatory of Music E. Duni in Matera.


The current issue of This Century’s Review draws back the curtain on excerpts from a Passion play. The Passion was the public execution of a death penalty – a gruesome spectacle still practised by humankind. Each of the following contributions will deal with some aspect of the drama of law, where drama is understood in the Greek sense of action. While it is true that the law is created by constitutional assemblies and parliaments, it is equally true that it regenerates itself constantly in its application to specific cases. It is implemented by individuals playing to a chorus that is neither imaginary nor fictitious, rather, that represents the collectivity itself. Humankind still requires the theatre, the persuasive force of gestures and dialectics, and the link between law and theatre remains binding. The law must always have a plot, not only in the trials carried out in the halls of justice.

The first issue of This Century’s Review claimed that law has an existential character. It is a preliminary choice that is part of our everyday lives. This view is now further underlined as it becomes clear that the application of a legal norm requires a dialectic awareness based on the need to select between available material and facts, as well as the ability to communicate one’s choices effectively. Legal procedures are norms that must be respected and nonetheless leave wide scope for action. It is in the actual implementation of the law that individuals recite their personal and unique monologues to the chorus. Each individual has a part in which she reconstructs her own version of events and her own arguments; she narrates her own reality and, in particular, seeks the consensus of the collectivity. The collectivity is not an impassive observer, but an active interlocutor who may or may not identify with the destiny of the individual. The collectivity is the recipient and at the same time the judge of the abstract legal norm.

The law is alive to the degree that it is perceived by public opinion, in interstate negotiations, by the media, by the national and international press, at conferences, in academic forums, in social networks and so forth. If the audience remains indifferent, the legal debate fails.

According to This Century’s Review, the legal debate shakes the very foundations of a society; it determines its values, its sense of security and its fears. It is a debate that may take a rational form, giving visibility to opposing opinions, but always has the creative force of the word. The law ensures that a flood of words, arguments and sentiments are channelled into legal procedures. It enhances their efficacy and shapes the destiny both of individual existences and of entire societies.

Editorial, Issue 02
Laura Di Gregorio, Editor-in-chief

Collaboration with conductor Paolo Manetti

La salita al Calvario
La salita al Calvario


A Castle of Words Issue 03

Issue 01, 56 PAGES, €10

  • "Rationality is a concept that ceases to appear utopian when we decide to achieve it." Editorial, Issue 01

    "Legal debate has an existential character whatever the specific issues under analysis." Editorial, Issue 01

Photo: Dirk Vogel

Authors Issue 01 // biographies

Mattias Kumm - Professor of Law at New York University School of Law and Research Professor at the Social Science Research Center and Humboldt University in Berlin: Total Rights and the Banality of Injustice

Mattias Kumm is Inge Rennert Professor of Law at New York University School of Law, as well as holding a Research Professorship on 'Globali- zation and the Rule of Law' at the Social Science Research Center (Wissenschaftszentrum Berlin für Sozialforschung, WZB) and Humboldt University in Berlin. Kumm's research and teaching focuses on basic issues in Global, European and Comparative Public Law. His work emphasizes the analytical and normative connection between law, claims to legitimate authority and public reason, and the institutional conditions under which such claims can be made plausible. He argues for the need to reconceive the liberal-democratic constitutional tradition in cosmopolitan and pluralist terms. Among his intellectual influences are Hans Kelsen, Robert Alexy, and Ronald Dworkin. Professor Mattias Kumm lives and works in New York City and Berlin.

Virgílio Afonso da Silva - Professor of Constitutional Law at the University of San Paolo: Discovering the Court: or, How Rights Awareness Puts the Brazilian Supreme Court in the Spotlight

Virgílio Afonso da Silva is Professor of Law at the University of São Paulo, where he teaches constitutional law, human rights, constitutional theory, and political and electoral systems. He received his doctoral degree from the University of Kiel, Germany. His works on constitutional interpretation, human rights (including social and economic rights), political representation and electoral systems have been published in Portuguese, English, Spanish, and German. He has been a visiting fellow at the Max Planck Institute of Comparative Public Law and International Law in Heidelberg, and at the Humboldt University in Berlin. He is a member of the scientific board of the São Paulo Research Foundation (Fapesp).

Guilherme Leite Gonçalves - Research Fellow at the Free University in Berlin at Bremen University: Are We Aware of the Current Recolonisation of the South?

Guilherme Leite Gonçalves has a Ph.D in the Sociology of Law from the University of Salento, Italy. He is currently a Humboldt Foundation George Foster Research Fellow at the Free University in Berlin and at Bremen University.

Edmund Boyo - Partner at Clifford Chance based in Frankfurt: The Increasing Demand for Infrastructure Financing

Edmund Boyo is a Partner at Clifford Chance based in Frankfurt who joined the firm in 1998. He specialises in International Project Finance (including toll roads, airports, ports, petrochemicals, and mining), asset finance and general banking. He is the global co-head of the firm’s Africa Group. Boyo has led the Clifford Chance team on numerous landmark transactions including advising the finance parties on the commercial bank and Islamic bank backed project financing of a USD 12.5 billion bauxite mine and refinery and aluminium smelter and rolling mill in Saudi Arabia (Middle East Industrial Deal of the Year 2010 – PFI and Middle East Mining and Metals Deal of the Year 2011 – Project Finance Magazine), and advising SABIC (as sponsor) and Saudi Kayan (as project company) on Saudi Kayan’s IPO and the ECA and commercial and Islamic bank backed project financing of a USD 10 billion petrochemicals project in Saudi Arabia (Middle East Petrochemicals Deal of the Year 2009 – Project Finance Magazine).

Mariella de Masellis - Counsellor for the Fourth Penal Section of the Corte d’Appello in Rome: How Judges Assess Fear

Mariella de Masellis has been a judge since 1989. She has worked in Calabria and Campania in Italy dealing with complicated cases involving organized crime, and was the anti-mafia public prosecutor in Salerno in Southern Italy for seven years. She is currently the counsellor for the Fourth Penal Section of the Corte d’Appello in Rome, where she is in charge of enforcing arrest warrants issued by other European Union countries, also in matters of freezing assets - the seizure and confiscation of assets of those who are considered a danger to society, for example Mafiosi – and also for the award of compensation to those who were in preventive custody and were subsequently found not guilty. She has been involved for many years in educational activities. She is the co-author of the book Violenza in famiglia. Percorsi giurisprudenziali (Giuffré 2011).

Winfried Bullinger - Lawyer at CMS Asche Sigle and Professor at Brandenburg University of Technology in Cottbus: Copyright, Pirates and Internet

Winfried Bullinger was born in Munich, Germany in 1965. He studied Fine Art (Painting) at Michaelis School of Fine Art, University of Cape Town, South Africa and at the University of Art Berlin (UDK), Germany, from 1987 to 1993. He studied for his Masters Degree at the UDK in 1993, writing his dissertation on art and falsification. Bullinger has also studied law and now practices at the international law firm CMS Asche Sigle. In both his photographic artwork and in his legal work he focuses on the human condition. He lives in Potsdam and Berlin. Recent exhibitions (selection): 2008 Caves, Goethe Institut in Cooperation with Herakleidon Museum, Athen (Solo); Caves Kehrer Verlag Heidelberg; 2009 Traces, Concent Art Berlin; 2009 Artists from Berlin, Museum of Modern Art, Skopje; 2010 Waterplaces, Curatorial Partners, Karlsruhe; 2010 Gallery Bob van Orsouw, Zürich; 2011 Gallery Sassa Trülzsch, Berlin.

Simonetta Agnello Hornby - Writer and children’s lawyer in London: Traces of Awareness between Law and Literature

Simonetta Agnello Hornby is a writer of international renown – she is the winner of many literary prizes, including the ‘Stresa di Narrativa’ and P.E.N. Club Italy awards. She has spent most of her life working as a children’s lawyer in Brixton, South London. Moreover, she chaired The Special Educational Needs and Disability Tribunal for eight years. Novels: La Mennulara (The Almond Picker), 2002; La Zia Marchesa (The Marchesa), 2004; Boccamurata (Sealed Lips), 2007; Vento Scomposto (There’s Nothing Wrong with Lucy), 2009; Camera Oscura (The Dark Room), 2010; La Monaca (The Nun), 2010; Un filo d’olio, 2011

Klaus Walter - DJ and author in Frankfurt/Main: Get up, Stand up – Legal Awareness in Pop

Klaus Walter is a DJ and author on topics related to pop culture, politics, and sports. From 1984 to 2008 he was moderator of the programme ‘Der Ball ist rund’ (The ball is round) of the Hessischen Rundfunk (Hessian Radio) in Frankfurt/Main – voted numerous times the best radio programme in Germany by the readers of the ‘Spex’ and ‘Intro’ magazines. Since 2008 he has worked as moderator and editor for the ByteFM Internet radio (‘Grimme Online Award’ winner in 2009). He has written articles and hosted radio programmes for numerous publications (Rolling Stone, Spex, Die Zeit, Frieze, Süddeutsche Zeitung, TAZ, WOZ, Melodie & Rhythmus, Spiegel Online, Jungle World) and radio channels (DLF, Deutschlandradio Kultur, BR, NDR, WDR, HR). In 2005 he co- authored ‘Plattenspieler’ (Turntable), a book of conversations with Frank Witzel and Thomas Meinecke, which was followed by ‘Die Bundesrepublik Deutschland’ (The German Federal Republic) in 2009. He is also active in giving seminars and lectures – recently at the University of Paderborn and the Goethe University in Frankfurt/Main.

Clemens-Tobias Lange - Artist working in Hamburg and Venice: Beyond the Visible

Clemens-Tobias Lange is born in Berlin 1960, works in Hamburg. He was a student both of Emilio Vedova and Ennio Chiggio and trained in the Accademia delle Belle Arti in Venice. His works are of international significance, and are regularly exhibited in Europe, the United States of America, and Japan. He has received prestigious prizes, the latest being ‘The City of Ludwigsburg Antiquarian Prize for Book Culture’ (2012).

Collaboration with the artist
Clemens-Tobias Lange

A gift with the first 400 copies: Two original prints by the artist Clemens-Tobias Lange